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Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

3 edition of Gangs and victimization at school. found in the catalog.

Gangs and victimization at school.

Gangs and victimization at school.

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Published by National Center for Education Statistics in [Washington, D.C.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gangs -- United States -- Statistics,
  • School violence -- United States -- Statistics,
  • Students -- Crimes against -- United States -- Statistics

  • Edition Notes

    GenreStatistics.
    SeriesEducation policy issues
    ContributionsNational Center for Education Statistics.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[2] p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17791373M
    OCLC/WorldCa33085852

    Regardless of whether measures of violence or measures of victimization that include theft are used, a clear relationship between gang activity in communities and school violence have been established both within the academic literature and based on national statistics of reported crimes in schools. 6 Gang Organization, Offending, and Victimization drug dealers. The research has since grown to examine areas such as the penetration of gangs into community organization (Venkatesh ) and the ability of gangs to organize homicide (Decker and Curry ). The instrumental-rational perspective, as described by Decker and Curry (

      A quarter of gang members are between 15 and 17 years of age and the average gang member age is between 17 and Gangs target young vulnerable teens who are . The Gang Risk Intervention Program (GRIP) is funded by the California Department of Education and operates in about 15 of California’s 58 counties. It “provides on-campus counseling about gangs through school counselors, police, and gang specialists. The program includes sports and recreational activities, job training, and apprenticeships.

      He is the recipient of a Graduate Research Fellowship from the National Institute of Justice and is the author of Confronting Gangs: Crime and Community (Oxford Press, with G. David Curry and Scott H. Decker). Richard K. Moule Jr is a doctoral student in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. He received his. The risks of victimization for female gang members have grown in number since young women have gone from being just appendages of their male counterparts to becoming a respected member of a gang. An immediate risk of becoming involved with a gang is how a female may be initiated into the gang.


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Gangs and victimization at school Download PDF EPUB FB2

Gangs and victimization at school [3] p. (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: John H Ralph; Kelly W Colopy; Christine McRae; Bruce Daniel; National Center for Education Statistics,; United States.

Office of. Book Microform: National government publication: Microfiche: English: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Gangs -- United States -- Statistics. School violence -- United States -- Statistics. Gangs.

View all subjects; More like this: Similar Items. This issue brief looks at the relationship between gang presence in schools and students' reports of victimization and fear. There is limited data about the. To date, research that has explored the impact of gangs in school has been quantitative in nature and consistently identifies a direct link between gang presence and school-based delinquency, victimization, and fear of crime, but it tells us little about the nuances of these relationships.

Table 1. Student victimization and fear at school, by gang presence and students' residence: Presence of gangs at school and students' residence: Victimization in last 6 months* Ever fearing an attack: Avoiding places inside school: Brought something to school for protection in last 6months: At school: To or from school: Total: %: + Impact of gangs on victimization at school.

Characteristics of Gangs in Schools Chandler and colleagues () reported that 28 percent of the surveyed students reported gangs in schools. However, their analysis used only one indicator of gang presence, responses to the question: "Are.

In order to assess gang activity in and around schools, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey asked students ages 12–18 if gangs were present at their school 1 during the school year. All gangs, whether or not they were involved in violent or illegal activity, were included.

In a national survey, 45 percent of high school students and 35 percent of middle-schoolers said that there were gangs — or students who considered themselves part of a gang — in their school.2 Nearly one in 12 youth said they belonged to a gang at some point during their teenage years The presence of street gangs at school also can be very disruptive to the school environment because gangs may not only create fear among students but also increase the level of violence in school.

Gang presence is also an important contributor to overall levels of student victimization at school. Gang members have been known to kick, punch, hit, or even kill their victims.

People get hurt if they are in the wrong place at the wrong time. If gangs or gang members are in your school or neighborhood, you know it. Learn About Gangs. Gangs can be organized around race or ethnic group, money making activities, or territory. These include: (a) the incidents of victimization are more violent in nature toward both students and teachers; (b) fear permeates the school environment possibly paralyzing prevention efforts; and (c) the social structure of gangs convolutes what is known about peer influence on bullying and victimization incidents due to deeply rooted history.

Drawing on a report published by the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice in and other literature, Youth Gangs in Schools analyzes findings from the School Crime Supplements (SCS) to the National Crime Victim Survey, describes characteristics of gangs in schools, and discusses contributory factors to gang prevalence in schools.

Victimization at School: Grades K– The type of victimization that likely comes to mind when you think about children being harmed at school is a school. shooting. When a school shooting—such as the one at Columbine in —does occur, it is difficult to watch the news or read the newspaper without hearing about the incident.

Self-Control, Gang Membership, and Victimization: An Integrated Approach to the Risk Factors of Violent Victimization by Kristina Childs A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts Department of Criminology College of Arts and Sciences University of South Florida Major Professor: John K.

Cochran, Ph.D. Christine Sellers, Ph.D. Kim Lersch, Ph.D. occur in school (Benbenishty & Astor, ) and their interrelations.

Some of the school victimization literature has included witnessing of violence and threats against the school itself because these can engender fear and have been shown to have negative consequences (Brock, Nickerson, O’Malley, &.

Thus an enhancement model of gang membership appears to best fit both offending and victimization rates. This effect of gang affiliation on victimization goes beyond gang members' involvement in violent offending; violence and gang status equate with cumulative disadvantage in terms of violent victimization.

In order to assess gang activity in and around the vicinity of schools, the School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey asked students ages 12–18 if gangs were present at their school 49 during the school year. books because the rate of theft is very high and books and school pr operty of peer victimization in public violence for Bobby at home and in school, drug abuse, gang activity, and crime.

Gangs and Victimization at School. Education Policy Issues: Statistical Perspectives. Ralph, John H.; And Others. This issue brief looks at the relationship between gang presence in schools and students' reports of victimization and fear.

There is limited data about the causes of either juvenile street violence or school-related crime. Data collected in and reveal: (1) minority students living.

Fifteen percent of students report gangs present at their school. Of these, 35% feared attack at school and 24% going to or from school, according to the National Crime Victimization Survey Report, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Department of Justice.

The current study represents the first attempt to examine how genetic and environmental factors work in concert to influence gang membership, victimization, and the effect of gang membership on victimization experiences.Research with gang members in St.

Louis found that exposure to gang-related violence involving the gang member, his close friends, and/or family members led the individual to renounce ties to the gang (Decker and Lauritsen, ). Decker and Lauritsen note: “Familial ties and victimization.

Relying on qualitative data, Miller highlights how female gang members navigate risk within and outside of their gangs, establishing that some behaviors (i.e., abstaining from criminal activity) may be protective against violence from rival gangs while simultaneously placing females at risk of victimization by their fellow gang members.